Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/26533
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Social Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Masculinities and emotional expression in UK Servicemen: 'Big boys don't cry'? (Forthcoming/Available Online)
Authors: McAllister, Lauren
Callaghan, Jane
Fellin, Lisa C
Contact Email: jane.callaghan@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: military
masculinity
emotion
mental health
combat
Issue Date: 12-Feb-2018
Citation: McAllister L, Callaghan J & Fellin LC (2018) Masculinities and emotional expression in UK Servicemen: 'Big boys don't cry'? (Forthcoming/Available Online), Journal of Gender Studies.
Abstract: Dominant discourses of military servicemen position them as more prone to psychological damage than the general population, but as reluctant to seek psychological assistance, because of the military culture of ‘toughness’, a military masculinity, that values stoicism, emotional control and invulnerability and implicitly excludes ‘feminine’ characteristics like emotionality. This is seen as a barrier to military personnel seeking help, by implicitly discouraging emotional disclosure and expression. This article presents an analysis of semi-structured interviews with six male military and ex-military personnel, focused on their experience and understandings of emotion, emotional expression and ‘mental health’ in the military. The dominant construction of military masculinity certainly renders some forms of emotion inexpressible within certain contexts. However, we argue that the construct is more complex than a simple exclusion of the ‘feminine’ and the ‘emotional’. We explore how the highly masculine notions of military solidarity and 'brotherhood' create a ‘safe’ masculine space within which men could share their emotional experiences, but also highlight how this space for emotional expression is relatively constrained. We argue that these notions of solidarity and brotherhood open a space for emotional connection and expression that must be respected and worked with creatively, in therapeutic and other interventions.
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09589236.2018.1429898
Rights: © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, and is not altered, transformed, or built upon in any way.

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